Thursday, 22 January 2015

Brooks's law: Adding manpower to a late software project makes it later.

"Adding manpower to a late software project makes it later."



According to Brooks himself, the law is an "outrageous oversimplification",[1] but it captures the general rule. Brooks points to two main factors that explain why it works this way:
  1. It takes some time for the people added to a project to become productive. Brooks calls this the "ramp up" time. Software projects are complex engineeringendeavors, and new workers on the project must first become educated about the work that has preceded them; this education requires diverting resources already working on the project, temporarily diminishing their productivity while the new workers are not yet contributing meaningfully. Each new worker also needs to integrate with a team composed of multiple engineers who must educate the new worker in their area of expertise in the code base, day by day. In addition to reducing the contribution of experienced workers (because of the need to train), new workers may even have negative contributions – for example, if they introduce bugs that move the project further from completion.
  2. Communication overheads increase as the number of people increases. Due to combinatorial explosion, the number of different communication channelsincreases rapidly with the number of people.[3] Everyone working on the same task needs to keep in sync, so as more people are added they spend more time trying to find out what everyone else is doing.


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooks's_law

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